Connie Smith
The Lost Tapes

1. Just One Time
Dallas Frazier/A.L. Owens
SONY/ATV Acuff Rose BMI/Unichappel Music Inc. BMI

2. I Never Once Stopped Loving You
Bill Anderson/Jan Howard
SONY/ATV Tree Publishing BMI

3. Louisiana Man
Doug Kershaw/Billy Deaton
SONY/ATV Acuff Rose Music BMI

4. Cincinnati, Ohio
Bill Anderson
Johnny Bienstock Music BMI

5. Just For What I Am
Dallas Frazier/A.L. Owens
SONY/ATV Acuff Rose BMI/Unichappel Music Inc. BMI

6. Once A Day
Bill Anderson
Johnny Bienstock Music BMI

7. If It Ain't Love (Let's Leave It Alone)
Dallas Frazier/A.L. Owens
SONY/ATV Acuff Rose BMI

8. Long Black Limosuine
Bobby George/Vern Stovall
Unichappel Music

9. The Race Is On
Don Rollins
Glad Music Publishing & Recording BMI/Pappy Daily Music LP BMI/SONY/ATV Tree Publishing BMI

10. Amazing Grace
Traditional

11. How Great Thou Art
Stuart K. Hine
Manna Music Inc. ASCAP

12. Where Is My Castle [Cracker Barrel Exclusive Bonus Track]

13. He Touched Me [Cracker Barrel Exclusive Bonus Track]

Produced by: Marty Stuart
Recorded, Mixed and Mastered by: Mick Conley
Executive Producer: Thomas Gramuglia
Original Master Tape Transfers: John Jongklaus
Artwork/Graphics: Jay Jackson/Screen Play
Photos: Courtesy Of Connie Smith Archives

Special Thanks to Scotty Moore, Ronnie Pugh, Pete Wade, Jimmy Capps, Gail Pollack, Harold Bradley and Mark Dottore for their invaluable assistance.

Production Coordinator: Maria Elena Orbea
Cartage: Phillip Clark

The World of Country Music and the American Armed Forces have remained close allies for many years. Countless stories have been written and told to country music stars as to how the sound of their voice or a particular song of theirs coming through the speakers of a radio or jukebox offered comfort and inspiration in an uncertain, lonely hour or in the throes of a heavy heartache known as homesickness.

The most memorable visits to troops occur when country stars make personal appearances and perform at various bases, USO clubs or camps within the range of battle zones. Another steady, more accessible means of entertainment has been the airwaves.

In the 1960s each branch of the service produced fifteen minute country music oriented syndicated radio broadcasts which were aired weekly across the nation, as well as internationally on the Armed Forces Radio Network. The Marines offered

The Leatherneck Jamboree, the Army's production was deemed Country Style U.S.A. The Air Force called their show Country Music Time. The Navy's program was known as Navy Hoedown. Two formats were created as the templates for these shows. Both versions were hosted by a notable announcer with military personnel on hand to promote recruiting. The musical component is where the shows varied. Format one

consisted of the star of the week reading dialogue, doing light spinning their latest and greatest records. Format two followed the same dialogue design, however, the music was performed live in a recording studio with the artists being backed by some of Nashville's famed studio musicians. The songs were later edited into a scripted program. At the recording session each artist was allowed thirty minutes to rehearse enough songs to fill a fifteen minute show. In the instance, an artist was having fun and everyone was on a particularly good roll, the red light stayed on until there was enough material to be edited into multiple shows. With time being of the essence the band usually rehearsed a song with the guest artist only once. The song was then recorded. Seldom was there a re-take. Interviews and spinning their latest and greatest records. Format two followed the same dialogue design, however, the music was performed live in a recording studio with the artists being backed by some of Nashville's famed studio musicians. The songs were later edited into a scripted program. At the recording session each artist was allowed thirty minutes to rehearse enough songs to fill a fifteen minute show. In the instance, an artist was having fun and everyone was on a particularly good roll, the red light stayed on until there was enough material to be edited into multiple shows. With time being of the essence, the band usually rehearsed a song with the guest artist only once. The song was then recorded. Seldom was there a re-take.

On December 8, 1972 Connie Smith arrived at Music City Recorders for a Navy Hoedown recording appointment. The studio owner and master engineer listed for the sessions was Elvis Presley's original guitarist, former Sun Records engineer and A&R legend, Scotty Moore. The assistant engineer was Al Gore (no relation to the Vice-President). Sadly, the tracking sheets listing the musical personnel for Connie Smith's December session have been lost.

The steel guitarist is unquestionably Pete Drake. The fiddle player is no doubt, Johnny Gimble. Their signature styles confirm their presence. Pianist Marvin Hughes was the session leader for many of the Armed Forces shows produced in Nashville. It is speculated that Mr. Hughes is the pianist on the Connie Smith date. It is also speculated that the electric guitarist is the incomparable Grady Martin, the bassist Barry Chance and the drummer, session ace

Kenneth Buttrey. There is no speculation however, as to the power and majesty of Connie Smith's performance. Connie was eight years into a string of hits for RCA Victor and her initial wave of popularity was at its zenith. Then as now, the range of heartfelt emotion she invests into every syllable of every word of a song sets her apart and casts her into an awed realm all her own.

In the course of one hour's time Miss Smith delivered sixteen textbook performances for the ages. Her vocal power on this session is absolutely stunning.

There is no hard evidence proving that all the songs recorded that day were ever released, making the December 8 session all the more a treasure.

As on so many classic country recordings, the role of the steel guitar is paramount. Beginning with Connie's breakthrough 1964 hit Once a Day, steel guitarist

Weldon Myrick has often been credited by Connie as the one single musician who created the Connie Smith sound. Myrick's steel guitar was the dancing partner to Smith's soaring vocals on most all of her now legendary recordings. The same can be said of Pete Drake's recorded performances on Tammy Wynette's recordings from the same era. It's hard to imagine D-I-V-O-R-C-E or Stand By Your Man without the sound of Drake's trembling steel guitar playing alongside of Tammy's heart-wrenching vocals. To hear Connie Smith and Pete Drake collaborate and recast her and Myrick's blueprint arrangements without abandoning the soul of Smith's Victor recordings, is worth the price of admission alone.

Of the sixteen titles recorded at the December 8th session, thirteen have been selected here by merit of total performance. The original two track masters are long since lost. Their last known whereabouts was a Music Row studio in Nashville, circa 1990, when producer Snuffy Miller transferred the analog reels into a digital format utilizing the Sony PCM 1630 system. At the time of transferal Miller embellished some of the tracks with synthesized strings.

The Navy Hoedown sessions were later purchased by Hindsight Records CEO, Mr. Thomas Gramuglia for release as an installment on his Country Rewind label's anthology of rare and unreleased country music recordings.

At the request of Mr. Gramuglia, on August 25 & 26, 2014, Connie Smith, along with engineer Mick Conley, Marty Stuart, Paul Martin, Harry Stinson, Terry Wilson, Christian Davis and Kris Wilkinson's Superlative Strings gathered at Apostle Paul's Clubhouse Recording Studio in Hendersonville, Tennessee and retouched history as lightly as possible. Painstaking measures were taken to embellish these songs in a pure and authentic light. The original 1972 performances were approached with the same care that goes into a frame by frame restoration of a classic film. The intention being to offer critics, scholars and fans alike a twenty-first century out of time experience that lovingly mirrors a golden age that was indeed a perfect time in country music.

Marty Stuart

Nashville

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